A Cromwell Adventure – Part 9: Author Q+A3 – The Classic FAQ’s

Eight days from now, SHAKING THE THRONE will be available! Today is part three of a ten-part series, letting you into the world of King Henry VIII’s Chief Minister Thomas Cromwell, and his master secretary Nicóla Frescobaldi, as they embark on part two of THE QUEENMAKER SERIES.

Part one of the series, FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, is out now, covering Cromwell and Frescobaldi in 1529 – 1533,  SHAKING THE THRONE, covering 1533-1536, will be available worldwide on October 1st. NO AMOUR AGAINST FATE shall cover 1537 – 1540 and will be released September 2019.

Let’s jump right in, with answers to the most commonly asked questions about the adventures of Cromwell and Frescobaldi, in order of most common FAQ’s, but first, the synopsis –

November 1533 – Thomas Cromwell and Nicóla Frescobaldi have their queen on the throne. The Catholic Church is being destroyed as the Reformation looms over England. Cromwell has total power at court and in parliament, while Frescobaldi wins favour with the King’s illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy.

But England’s fate is uncertain. The nobles still despise Cromwell and his Italian creature. Anne has not given the king a son. Queen Katherine refuses to give up her title, and Thomas More and Bishop Fisher defy their king. The final Plantagenets think they should hold the throne, while the Catholics want Princess Mary named as heir.

England can be reformed, but Cromwell must dissolve all the monasteries and abbeys, and with the King on his side, the plan to change religion will sever heads. Queen Anne is losing Henry’s love, but Cromwell could suffer if Anne loses her crown. Frescobaldi creates a daring plan to replace Anne and regain the Pope’s favour, but Cromwell must execute the plans on his own. Schemes will go astray and the wrong heads will be severed to satisfy a vengeful sovereign.

Kings will rise, Queens shall fall, children will perish, and the people of England will march in a pilgrimage to take Cromwell’s head, but Frescobaldi will have to make the ultimate sacrifice.

Read part 1 and part 2 of the FAQ’s here, otherwise here are the final FAQ’s…

WHY DO YOU LIKE THOMAS CROMWELL SO MUCH?

What’s not to like about my book-husband, Thomas? It is often said that Shakespeare ripped off everything he ever wrote, and his rags-to-riches genius life story was even a rip-off… of Thomas Cromwell’s story. Cromwell started with a standard life, born into a simple family in 1485, and yet managed to get himself into Europe as a soldier in the French army to fight the Italians, in a time when a large portion of the population never left the village they were born into. Cromwell managed to survive a slaughter, and make it to Florence, where he started a new life, educating and enriching himself enough to return to England and into the household of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, England’s most powerful man. Cromwell rose as Wolsey rose, and managed to escape a brutal fall from grace upon Wolsey’s death. Cromwell then went on to create and destroy queens, rush the Reformation into England and completely changed the laws of England, all in the same decade. He went from common to Earl in a handful of years, only to be spectacularly hacked to death on the block. Who else can claim such a great story?

DO YOU HAVE A LOT OF ROMANCE IN YOUR TUDOR NOVELS?

I am surprised how often people ask this question. There is an element of love in the book, but it’s all PG rated and only an undercurrent, part of a strong political life. Romance is not a big theme of the series.

IS IT HARD TO WRITE HISTORICAL FIGURES AND EVENTS, SINCE YOU HAVE TO FOLLOW AN EXACT STORYLINE?

I have an awful lot of freedom within the timeline of Cromwell’s life. While the people and events are real, how Cromwell and Frescobaldi can view it, can feel, can react is still free to explore. From the outset I knew how the story had to end, but everything that happens is seen through a new Cromwell and also through Frescobaldi.

WILL IT BE HARD TO KILL CROMWELL IN THE LAST BOOK?

I accepted from the beginning that I had to kill Cromwell in a brutal, violent, vicious end. I have devised a way to get through that without feeling as bad. I will feel very bad for Cromwell, and even worse from Frescobaldi. I thought I would feel bad killing Anne Boleyn, but that was quite easy.

WHAT FUN THINGS HAPPEN WHEN YOU WRITE?

I write a pretty serious series at the moment, so characters are usually killing people, imprisoning people, torturing people, watching people suffer. Finding fun moments can be hard to come by, so I have to add in little jokes where I can. One fun thing that happens? When I write a character is feeling tired, I tend to start yawning. Now I’ve written yawn, I’m yawning.

Tomorrow – themes in the novel: Who is Henry Fitzroy?

FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, the first edition in the Queenmaker trilogy, is available worldwide in paperback and on Kindle now.

FROM NOW UNTIL OCTOBER 1ST, GET BOOK ONE FOR 50% off on Kindle.

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A Cromwell Adventure – Part 8: Author Q+A2 – The Classic FAQ’s

Nine days from now, SHAKING THE THRONE will be available! Today is part two of a ten-part series, letting you into the world of King Henry VIII’s Chief Minister Thomas Cromwell, and his master secretary Nicóla Frescobaldi, as they embark on part two of THE QUEENMAKER SERIES.

Part one of the series, FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, is out now, covering Cromwell and Frescobaldi in 1529 – 1533,  SHAKING THE THRONE, covering 1533-1536, will be available worldwide on October 1st. NO AMOUR AGAINST FATE shall cover 1537 – 1540 and will be released September 2019.

Let’s jump right in, with answers to the most commonly asked questions about the adventures of Cromwell and Frescobaldi, in order of most common FAQ’s, but first, the synopsis –

November 1533 – Thomas Cromwell and Nicóla Frescobaldi have their queen on the throne. The Catholic Church is being destroyed as the Reformation looms over England. Cromwell has total power at court and in parliament, while Frescobaldi wins favour with the King’s illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy.

But England’s fate is uncertain. The nobles still despise Cromwell and his Italian creature. Anne has not given the king a son. Queen Katherine refuses to give up her title, and Thomas More and Bishop Fisher defy their king. The final Plantagenets think they should hold the throne, while the Catholics want Princess Mary named as heir.

England can be reformed, but Cromwell must dissolve all the monasteries and abbeys, and with the King on his side, the plan to change religion will sever heads. Queen Anne is losing Henry’s love, but Cromwell could suffer if Anne loses her crown. Frescobaldi creates a daring plan to replace Anne and regain the Pope’s favour, but Cromwell must execute the plans on his own. Schemes will go astray and the wrong heads will be severed to satisfy a vengeful sovereign.

Kings will rise, Queens shall fall, children will perish, and the people of England will march in a pilgrimage to take Cromwell’s head, but Frescobaldi will have to make the ultimate sacrifice.

Read part 1 of the FAQ’s here, otherwise here we go…

DO I NEED TO KNOW ALL ABOUT THE TUDOR PERIOD TO READ THE SERIES?

I realise there are a large number of my readers who do not read much in terms of Tudor fiction. Whether you’ve come here from the Canna Medici series or from Secrets of Spain, or are new to my work, you can read the Queenmaker series. I have tried to write the series in way that caters for the broad range of readers who buy my books.

There are a large number of characters in this series, as I feel that no one in history could be left out. Plus, I have chapters which have half a dozen Thomases sitting around a table, so I always double down on making sure it is clear who is who, etc. If you know the Tudor period, you will have no trouble; if you are new, you should be able to keep up.

I do recommend reading the books in the order I wrote them. You could read them out of order, though if you read SHAKING THE THRONE first, you may not fully understand the dynamic of Cromwell and Frescobaldi.

WHAT ABOUT FRESCOBALDI’S SISTER?

Nicòletta Frescobaldi is the Duchess of Florence. The historical figure of Alessandro de’Medici, Duke of Florence, is written as faithfully as possible (here is a great book on ‘The Moor’).  The Duke did marry Margarete of Austria and have a mistress name Taddea who had his children, rather than his wife. The marriage between Nicòletta and Alessandro is pure fiction. Alessandro de’Medici was the alleged son of Pope Clement, and Nicòletta/Nicòla bind them all together. As Alessandro was faithful to no one, not even his favourite mistress, it is not inconceivable that he would keep a wife outside of Florence, hidden away from everyone. That theory allows me to write the Duchess as hidden from sight, and unable to keep her bastard daughter Giovanna. Of course, Nicòletta and Nicòla are the same person, as Nicòla is the sole surviving Frescobaldi family member.

CAN A WOMAN TRULY PRETEND TO BE A MAN?

You only have to look at many names in history to find it is entirely possible. Elisa Bernerström, Saint Marina, Hua Mulan, Hatshepsut, Hannah Snell, Margaret Ann Bulkley, Chevalier d’Eon… the list goes on. It is less about appearance, and more about confidence in pretending to be a man. In a world where men are powerful and women are not even human, it is easy to imagine women adopting new lives so they can live, rather than simply survive.

FRESCOBALDI SAYS “THE MIND OF A MAN IN THE BODY OF A WOMAN.” IS FRESCOBALDI A MAN TRAPPED IN THE WRONG BODY? IS IT RUDE TO ASK THE QUESTION?

In this instance, no, it’s not rude. Nicòla has a female body and a ‘male mind’, as it was thought, at that time, that educating a woman was folly, for they had no imperative other than reproduction. Frescobaldi certainly believes herself a woman, thinks and acts as a woman, but is considered the fantastical creature because it is impossible for a woman to be so naturally intelligent, cunning and capable (so they thought in the 1500’s). Queen Elizabeth I had to routinely say her weak female form was something she managed to overcome. We now know women are just as smart as any man, as capable, as powerful. Frescobaldi believes she has a male mind because that is what she has been told her entire life. Frescobaldi believes herself wholly a woman.

WERE CROMWELL AND HENRY VIII REALLY GOOD FRIENDS?

It is impossible to say for certain. Cromwell definitely gave the King everything he wanted, whenever he wanted it. I personally wrote Henry as a man ready to trust, ready to befriend, despite having been hurt before, the same way he never gave up on love (or what he thought was love). Cromwell was not a stuffy, boring politician – he was widely known as the king of parties and lavish events, hosted the King and everyone of note in England in his manors, was generous, charming, and kept swathes of birds in his Austin Friars garden, along with the ‘beast’ to entertain his guests (I wrote the beast as a leopard for the purpose of the story). I find it entirely possible Henry and Cromwell would have established a bond over the long periods they would have spent together.

Up tomorrow, the last few FAQ’s before we then head into details on the themes featured in the Queenmaker series. 

FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, the first edition in the Queenmaker trilogy, is available worldwide in paperback and on Kindle now.

FROM NOW UNTIL OCTOBER 1ST, GET BOOK ONE FOR 50% off on Kindle.

The moderate man shall inherit the kingdom. That man needs to be the Queenmaker.

London 1529 – Cardinal Wolsey has ruled England in King Henry VIII’s name for most of his reign. Now Henry wants to leave his extraordinary Spanish wife of twenty years, Queen Katherine, to marry Anne Boleyn and secure a male heir for the kingdom. Only God can end a marriage, through his appointed voices on Earth, the powerful Cardinal Wolsey, and Cardinal Campeggio sent from Rome in the Pope’s place. Wolsey’s faithful attendant, commoner Thomas Cromwell, has the mind, the skills and the ambition to secure a royal annulment.

Cromwell’s forgotten past in Italy reappears with Campeggio’s new attendant, Nicóla Frescobaldi, the peculiar son of Cromwell’s former Italian master. While the great Cardinals of Christendom fight the King, the Pope and their God for an annulment, Cromwell and Frescobaldi hold the power over a country at war with its own conscience. Cromwell is called the double-minded man, whose golden eyes make money appear. Now Cromwell wants the power to destroy the Catholic Church in England. Frescobaldi is known as the waif-like creature, the Pope’s favourite companion, but Frescobaldi wants freedom from Pope Clement and his Medici family in Italy.

Cromwell and Frescobaldi will place themselves into the heart of religious and political influence as they strive to create an English queen, or lose their heads for their crimes and sinful secrets.

A Cromwell Adventure – Part 7: Author Q+A1 – The Classic FAQ’s

Ten days from now, SHAKING THE THRONE will be available! Today is part one of a ten-part series, letting you into the world of King Henry VIII’s Chief Minister Thomas Cromwell, and his master secretary Nicóla Frescobaldi, as they embark on part two of THE QUEENMAKER SERIES.

Part one of the series, FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, is out now, covering Cromwell and Frescobaldi in 1529 – 1533,  SHAKING THE THRONE, covering 1533-1536, will be available worldwide on October 1st. NO AMOUR AGAINST FATE shall cover 1537 – 1540 and will be released September 2019.

Let’s jump right in, with answers to the most commonly asked questions about the adventures of Cromwell and Frescobaldi, in order of most common FAQ’s, but first, the synopsis –

November 1533 – Thomas Cromwell and Nicóla Frescobaldi have their queen on the throne. The Catholic Church is being destroyed as the Reformation looms over England. Cromwell has total power at court and in parliament, while Frescobaldi wins favour with the King’s illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy.

But England’s fate is uncertain. The nobles still despise Cromwell and his Italian creature. Anne has not given the king a son. Queen Katherine refuses to give up her title, and Thomas More and Bishop Fisher defy their king. The final Plantagenets think they should hold the throne, while the Catholics want Princess Mary named as heir.

England can be reformed, but Cromwell must dissolve all the monasteries and abbeys, and with the King on his side, the plan to change religion will sever heads. Queen Anne is losing Henry’s love, but Cromwell could suffer if Anne loses her crown. Frescobaldi creates a daring plan to replace Anne and regain the Pope’s favour, but Cromwell must execute the plans on his own. Schemes will go astray and the wrong heads will be severed to satisfy a vengeful sovereign.

Kings will rise, Queens shall fall, children will perish, and the people of England will march in a pilgrimage to take Cromwell’s head, but Frescobaldi will have to make the ultimate sacrifice.

ISN’T “NICOLA” A FEMALE NAME?

In short? No.

The long story? When people read or hear about the story of Cromwell and Frescobaldi, they read/hear “Nicola.” But Frescobaldi, being Italian, is “Nicòla,” which is a traditional Italian name for men of the nobility (ending in “a” gave English speakers the wrong impression it was feminine, but never was). The Frescobaldi family, which has suffered from war and illness, is down to only two people, Nicòla Frescobaldi and his sister, Nicòletta Frescobaldi. But, given the storyline, I chose the character name of Nicòla so a reader can identify with either male or female when reading the name, as Nicòla’s sexuality and orientation is a prime part of the storyline.

WHO IS THOMAS CROMWELL?

I am surprised anyone still asks this question, though go back ten years and plenty of people wouldn’t have a clue. Thomas Cromwell was low-born man born in around 1485, who ran away from home in Putney, England, at around 15. Cromwell went on a long and undocumented adventure through Italy, before returning to England around 10-15 years later, to work for a cardinal. Cromwell was an extraordinary man for any time period; he amassed a thorough education for a man of no means, and caught the eye of King Henry VIII, who was in need of a legal mind to secure his annulment to Queen Katherine. The ability to dismiss Katherine and install Anne Boleyn as queen made Cromwell one of the most powerful men in England’s political history. Click here to read all about Thomas Cromwell –  A Cromwell Adventure – Part 2 (opens new tab)

THOMAS CROMWELL IS A REAL HISTORICAL FIGURE, SO IS FRESCOBALDI A REAL HISTORICAL FIGURE TOO?

No, Frescobaldi is a fictional character in the series. All the characters in the book are real, and the timeline follows the real life events of the 1530’s, with the exception of Frescobaldi. When Cromwell was in Florence in the early 1500’s, he was begging in the streets, and caught the eye of Francesco Frescobaldi, a wealthy merchant who could speak English. The Frescobaldi family took young Cromwell in, and Nicòla Frescobaldi is the fictional son of the real man who saved  Cromwell. There is no historical record of Frescobaldi’s real-life children, though the family was a central figure in merchant Florence for several hundred years.

WHAT IS THE QUEENMAKER SERIES ALL ABOUT?

The Queenmaker series is based on Cromwell and Frescobaldi’s relationship. Frescobaldi arrives in England in May 1529, as an attendant to powerful Cardinal Campeggio. But Frescobaldi is no humble servant, for Frescobaldi is the favourite of Pope Clement VII, and is sent to spy on, and manipulate, Thomas Cromwell, the secretary of England’s powerful Cardinal Wolsey. Frescobaldi believes that Thomas Cromwell, who once lived in the Frescobaldi manor, was Niccolò Machiavelli’s muse when he wrote “The Prince” in the early 1510’s. Cromwell denies this, and yet displays all of Machiavelli’s traits and beliefs. Cromwell and Frescobaldi are bound together by their love and admiration for patriarch Francesco Frescobaldi, and soon find they are two similar minds – Cromwell, a common man placed in a position far higher than he should be, and Frescobaldi, an astute mind trapped in a ‘weak’ body. Between the pair, they can create any queen, destroy a religion, change any laws, and behead any enemy.

WHY READ ANOTHER BOOK ABOUT THOMAS CROMWELL?

This work of fiction is unique in that the books alternate between the POV of Cromwell and Frescobaldi. What Cromwell did to England – destroying the Catholic faith, implementing Protestantism, destroying the monasteries, removing Queen Katherine for Anne Boleyn, beheading Anne Boleyn for Jane Seymour, and replacing Jane Seymour with Anne of Cleves – is well known. But little of what Cromwell was thinking is known when he did all these things. Cromwell sat in obscurity for four hundred years, only to be dug from the archives as a villain, and recently has been rewritten as a hero. The Queenmaker Series does neither, as Cromwell can be compassionate, but he can also be cold. Ultimately, he serves his king and himself.

The book also tells the story from Frescobaldi’s POV, the “Waif”, Cromwell’s creature, who scurries about court in silence, always following Cromwell and doing his bidding. Frescobaldi is incredibly tough, intelligent  and well-connected. While Frescobaldi is mocked at court for being an effeminate creature, Frescobaldi has connections to Henry, Katherine, Anne, Cranmer, Fitzroy, More, Wyatt, Smeaton, Chapuys and plenty more central figures in Europe in the 1530’s.

HOW ACCURATE IS THE FICTIONAL SERIES IN TERMS OF HISTORICAL EVENTS?

I have battled to make sure the events, details, people involved,  locations, facts and the outcomes are as accurate as possible, based on all the research I have done, the result of many different sources. While the relationship between Cromwell and Frescobaldi is different from reality (obviously), Cromwell’s life, family, work, creations, and the changes to England’s landscape are all carefully laid out. There are 1001 books on Anne Boleyn and her demise, a central theme in this book (SHAKING THE THRONE is based on England 1533-1536), so this book tells the story through the eyes of Cromwell and Frescobaldi, rather than Anne.

Tomorrow – Part 2: more truth v reality in the 1530’s, what order to read the Queenmaker series,  Cromwell’s relationship with Wolsey and Henry, Frescobaldi’s sister, historical source used,  and more…

FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, the first edition in the Queenmaker trilogy, is available worldwide in paperback and on Kindle now.

FROM NOW UNTIL OCTOBER 1ST, GET BOOK ONE FOR 50% off ON KINDLE.

The moderate man shall inherit the kingdom. That man needs to be the Queenmaker.

London 1529 – Cardinal Wolsey has ruled England in King Henry VIII’s name for most of his reign. Now Henry wants to leave his extraordinary Spanish wife of twenty years, Queen Katherine, to marry Anne Boleyn and secure a male heir for the kingdom. Only God can end a marriage, through his appointed voices on Earth, the powerful Cardinal Wolsey, and Cardinal Campeggio sent from Rome in the Pope’s place. Wolsey’s faithful attendant, commoner Thomas Cromwell, has the mind, the skills and the ambition to secure a royal annulment.

Cromwell’s forgotten past in Italy reappears with Campeggio’s new attendant, Nicóla Frescobaldi, the peculiar son of Cromwell’s former Italian master. While the great Cardinals of Christendom fight the King, the Pope and their God for an annulment, Cromwell and Frescobaldi hold the power over a country at war with its own conscience. Cromwell is called the double-minded man, whose golden eyes make money appear. Now Cromwell wants the power to destroy the Catholic Church in England. Frescobaldi is known as the waif-like creature, the Pope’s favourite companion, but Frescobaldi wants freedom from Pope Clement and his Medici family in Italy.

Cromwell and Frescobaldi will place themselves into the heart of religious and political influence as they strive to create an English queen, or lose their heads for their crimes and sinful secrets.

HISTORICAL BOOK REVIEW SERIES: ‘La Reine Blanche, Mary Tudor- Henry VIII’s Sister’ by Sarah Bryson

Mary Tudor’s childhood was overshadowed by the men in her life: her father, Henry VII, and her brothers Arthur, heir to the Tudor throne, and Henry VIII. These men and the beliefs held about women at the time helped to shape Mary’s life. She was trained to be a dutiful wife and at the age of eighteen Mary married the French king, Louis XII, thirty-four years her senior.

When her husband died three months after the marriage, Mary took charge of her life and shaped her own destiny. As a young widow, Mary blossomed. This was the opportunity to show the world the strong, self-willed, determined woman she always had been. She remarried for love and at great personal risk to herself. She loved and respected Katherine of Aragon and despised Anne Boleyn – again, a dangerous position to take.

Author Sarah Bryson has returned to primary sources, state papers and letters, to unearth the truth about this intelligent and passionate woman. This is the story of Mary Tudor, told through her own words for the first time.

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I have always had a soft spot or Mary Tudor. She was the daughter of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York. One brother was destined to be king, and the other brother really took the throne. Her sister was Queen of Scotland. It could be easy to think Mary Tudor achieved little, but she might have been the happiest of them all.

Mary was only 18 when she had to marry the 52yo King of France. I can only think how foul that would be for Europe’s most beautiful princess (she was no fool, but as per the time period, her appearance was her talking point). Mary may have been sold off to the highest bidder by her brother Henry, but she had already planned her next move – to marry Henry’s bestie Charles Brandon. Brandon had already sidelined two wives and was ready to marry the lovely Mary.

Luckily for everyone, the French king died after three months of marriage and Mary married Brandon in secret. Bryson’s book tells this wonderful tale in full detail, of two people defying King Henry to hatch this plan and marry. Was Brandon a gold -digger? I shall reserve my opinion and you can make yours while reading the book.

The author used primary sources to write about the life of Mary, in order to create a full picture of who she was outside the shadows of the men around her. Mary’s letters have survived, giving us her own hand, her own thought process. Mary was the perfect princess; beautiful, virtuous, religious, skilled in all the areas a woman was meant to excel. But Mary was no uneducated woman – she may have been handed to France and into the bed of a creepy old guy, but she knew how to play men. Mary used a classic skill – make the man in her way think her ideas were all his, and then praised him for ‘his’ thoughts, while succeeding behind his back. Women with opinions were heretics; women who praised men after planting ideas were perfect wives/sisters/princesses/mothers. Mary used her charm not only for herself, but for people who came to her in need, a calming female voice in a harsh male world.

Mary became The White Queen (the nickname often now given to her grandmother Elizabeth) while wearing white, the French colour of mourning. Mary was meant to waiting to see if she was carrying the French heir, but instead she was writing, to plan the fortunes of the rest of her life. Mary wanted to come back to England, not stay in France and be married off again for English-French relations. Mary wanted to marry Brandon, and she was played the slow game in her words to her kingly brother.

Mary, of course, suffered for her marriage to Brandon, but being Henry’s favourite sister, returned to glory, bore many children with Brandon, and died in her fifties after spending her life beloved by her brother and husband. Her granddaughter Jane would become England’s queen for nine days. Mary was not just a king’s sister and pawn, she was a woman who was able to quietly plot the course of her life. Mary was not loud or dramatic in history, yet a woman born to an extraordinary couple, with extraordinary siblings, and lived her own free life in a time of great turmoil.

This is the only book I would turn to when referencing Mary Tudor. It is an essential volume on any discerning bookshelf.

HISTORICAL BOOK REVIEW SERIES: ‘Women in Medieval England’ by Lynda Telford

This fascinating book explores the status of women in medieval England, both before and after the Norman Conquest.

The author starts by contrasting the differences in status between Anglo/Danish or Saxon women with those who fell under the burden of the feudal system imposed by the Normans. She covers such subjects as marriage and childbirth, the rights and responsibilities of wives, separation and divorce, safety and security and the challenges of widowhood. She also examines such issues as virginity and chastity and the pressures placed on women by religious groups.

At a time when women’s rights were minimal, the author charts their struggles against the sexual politics of the era, its inequalities and its hypocrisies. She also examines the problems of the woman alone, from forced marriage to prostitution. The lives of ordinary women are the centre of attention, painting a fascinating picture of their courage and resilience against the background of their times.

cover and blurb via amazon

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Resting on the theme of women in history is Women in Medieval England. My initial interest in this book was the pre-conquest women included. England and its rulers is so often detailed as post-1066, so someone like myself with limited knowledge of the Anglo-Saxon era found the overview and laws of the time useful. New leaders made for new husbands for noble women, who may not even be able to understand them, given language barriers. A nightmare of any woman, and to cap it off, not speaking your new husband/owner’s language is a scary thought.

What classified as marriage was quite different (as I’m sure everyone knows) which made for a messy history and difficult lives for the women traded to their husbands. The book even delves into what was birth control in the pots-1066 era, and lol-worthy concepts for cures for impotence. Life for women was exceptionally difficult, mostly due to the largely uncontrollable act of pregnancy, and the book shows just how damned awful it was for our predecessors to battle on creating a new generation.
Married life was all kinds of awful – as everyone knows the ‘rule of thumb,’ in that a man cannot beat his wife with anything thicker than his thumb. Though, in some ways, you read this and wonder how much life has altered for many women. This book digs through a realities of being a woman in the medieval period, where men are cast as sword-wielding heroes, women have been left standing in mud-floor huts. This shines a light on those women, who had the temperament of saints, strength tougher than any soldier, and bravery beyond that of a king. The world was a strange place for women; you could die of the plague, or you could survive an outbreak and clean up in the vacant jobs market.
This is no heavy book you will be reaching for when researching, it is a read on the lives of women in a world none of us would want to return to. There is plenty of information to be had in here, without feeling like you’re in a history lesson, a book for those who would like to read for pleasure, not study.