‘SHAKING THE THRONE’ Author Q+A: Part 3 – The Classic FAQ’s

Eight days from now, SHAKING THE THRONE will be available! Today is part three of a ten-part series, letting you into the world of King Henry VIII’s Chief Minister Thomas Cromwell, and his master secretary Nicóla Frescobaldi, as they embark on part two of THE QUEENMAKER SERIES.

Part one of the series, FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, is out now, covering Cromwell and Frescobaldi in 1529 – 1533,  SHAKING THE THRONE, covering 1533-1536, will be available worldwide on October 1st. NO AMOUR AGAINST FATE shall cover 1537 – 1540 and will be released September 2019.

Let’s jump right in, with answers to the most commonly asked questions about the adventures of Cromwell and Frescobaldi, in order of most common FAQ’s, but first, the synopsis –

November 1533 – Thomas Cromwell and Nicóla Frescobaldi have their queen on the throne. The Catholic Church is being destroyed as the Reformation looms over England. Cromwell has total power at court and in parliament, while Frescobaldi wins favour with the King’s illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy.

But England’s fate is uncertain. The nobles still despise Cromwell and his Italian creature. Anne has not given the king a son. Queen Katherine refuses to give up her title, and Thomas More and Bishop Fisher defy their king. The final Plantagenets think they should hold the throne, while the Catholics want Princess Mary named as heir.

England can be reformed, but Cromwell must dissolve all the monasteries and abbeys, and with the King on his side, the plan to change religion will sever heads. Queen Anne is losing Henry’s love, but Cromwell could suffer if Anne loses her crown. Frescobaldi creates a daring plan to replace Anne and regain the Pope’s favour, but Cromwell must execute the plans on his own. Schemes will go astray and the wrong heads will be severed to satisfy a vengeful sovereign.

Kings will rise, Queens shall fall, children will perish, and the people of England will march in a pilgrimage to take Cromwell’s head, but Frescobaldi will have to make the ultimate sacrifice.

Read part 1 and part 2 of the FAQ’s here, otherwise here are the final FAQ’s…

WHY DO YOU LIKE THOMAS CROMWELL SO MUCH?

What’s not to like about my book-husband, Thomas? It is often said that Shakespeare ripped off everything he ever wrote, and his rags-to-riches genius life story was even a rip-off… of Thomas Cromwell’s story. Cromwell started with a standard life, born into a simple family in 1485, and yet managed to get himself into Europe as a soldier in the French army to fight the Italians, in a time when a large portion of the population never left the village they were born into. Cromwell managed to survive a slaughter, and make it to Florence, where he started a new life, educating and enriching himself enough to return to England and into the household of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, England’s most powerful man. Cromwell rose as Wolsey rose, and managed to escape a brutal fall from grace upon Wolsey’s death. Cromwell then went on to create and destroy queens, rush the Reformation into England and completely changed the laws of England, all in the same decade. He went from common to Earl in a handful of years, only to be spectacularly hacked to death on the block. Who else can claim such a great story?

DO YOU HAVE A LOT OF ROMANCE IN YOUR TUDOR NOVELS?

I am surprised how often people ask this question. There is an element of love in the book, but it’s all PG rated and only an undercurrent, part of a strong political life. Romance is not a big theme of the series.

IS IT HARD TO WRITE HISTORICAL FIGURES AND EVENTS, SINCE YOU HAVE TO FOLLOW AN EXACT STORYLINE?

I have an awful lot of freedom within the timeline of Cromwell’s life. While the people and events are real, how Cromwell and Frescobaldi can view it, can feel, can react is still free to explore. From the outset I knew how the story had to end, but everything that happens is seen through a new Cromwell and also through Frescobaldi.

WILL IT BE HARD TO KILL CROMWELL IN THE LAST BOOK?

I accepted from the beginning that I had to kill Cromwell in a brutal, violent, vicious end. I have devised a way to get through that without feeling as bad. I will feel very bad for Cromwell, and even worse from Frescobaldi. I thought I would feel bad killing Anne Boleyn, but that was quite easy.

WHAT FUN THINGS HAPPEN WHEN YOU WRITE?

I write a pretty serious series at the moment, so characters are usually killing people, imprisoning people, torturing people, watching people suffer. Finding fun moments can be hard to come by, so I have to add in little jokes where I can. One fun thing that happens? When I write a character is feeling tired, I tend to start yawning. Now I’ve written yawn, I’m yawning.

Tomorrow – themes in the novel: Who is Henry Fitzroy?

FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, the first edition in the Queenmaker trilogy, is available worldwide in paperback and on Kindle now.

FROM NOW UNTIL OCTOBER 1ST, GET BOOK ONE FOR 50% off on Kindle.

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