‘SHAKING THE THRONE’ Author Q+A: Part 2 – The Classic FAQ’s

Nine days from now, SHAKING THE THRONE will be available! Today is part two of a ten-part series, letting you into the world of King Henry VIII’s Chief Minister Thomas Cromwell, and his master secretary Nicóla Frescobaldi, as they embark on part two of THE QUEENMAKER SERIES.

Part one of the series, FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, is out now, covering Cromwell and Frescobaldi in 1529 – 1533,  SHAKING THE THRONE, covering 1533-1536, will be available worldwide on October 1st. NO AMOUR AGAINST FATE shall cover 1537 – 1540 and will be released September 2019.

Let’s jump right in, with answers to the most commonly asked questions about the adventures of Cromwell and Frescobaldi, in order of most common FAQ’s, but first, the synopsis –

November 1533 – Thomas Cromwell and Nicóla Frescobaldi have their queen on the throne. The Catholic Church is being destroyed as the Reformation looms over England. Cromwell has total power at court and in parliament, while Frescobaldi wins favour with the King’s illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy.

But England’s fate is uncertain. The nobles still despise Cromwell and his Italian creature. Anne has not given the king a son. Queen Katherine refuses to give up her title, and Thomas More and Bishop Fisher defy their king. The final Plantagenets think they should hold the throne, while the Catholics want Princess Mary named as heir.

England can be reformed, but Cromwell must dissolve all the monasteries and abbeys, and with the King on his side, the plan to change religion will sever heads. Queen Anne is losing Henry’s love, but Cromwell could suffer if Anne loses her crown. Frescobaldi creates a daring plan to replace Anne and regain the Pope’s favour, but Cromwell must execute the plans on his own. Schemes will go astray and the wrong heads will be severed to satisfy a vengeful sovereign.

Kings will rise, Queens shall fall, children will perish, and the people of England will march in a pilgrimage to take Cromwell’s head, but Frescobaldi will have to make the ultimate sacrifice.

Read part 1 of the FAQ’s here, otherwise here we go…

DO I NEED TO KNOW ALL ABOUT THE TUDOR PERIOD TO READ THE SERIES?

I realise there are a large number of my readers who do not read much in terms of Tudor fiction. Whether you’ve come here from the Canna Medici series or from Secrets of Spain, or are new to my work, you can read the Queenmaker series. I have tried to write the series in way that caters for the broad range of readers who buy my books.

There are a large number of characters in this series, as I feel that no one in history could be left out. Plus, I have chapters which have half a dozen Thomases sitting around a table, so I always double down on making sure it is clear who is who, etc. If you know the Tudor period, you will have no trouble; if you are new, you should be able to keep up.

I do recommend reading the books in the order I wrote them. You could read them out of order, though if you read SHAKING THE THRONE first, you may not fully understand the dynamic of Cromwell and Frescobaldi.

WHAT ABOUT FRESCOBALDI’S SISTER?

Nicòletta Frescobaldi is the Duchess of Florence. The historical figure of Alessandro de’Medici, Duke of Florence, is written as faithfully as possible (here is a great book on ‘The Moor’).  The Duke did marry Margarete of Austria and have a mistress name Taddea who had his children, rather than his wife. The marriage between Nicòletta and Alessandro is pure fiction. Alessandro de’Medici was the alleged son of Pope Clement, and Nicòletta/Nicòla bind them all together. As Alessandro was faithful to no one, not even his favourite mistress, it is not inconceivable that he would keep a wife outside of Florence, hidden away from everyone. That theory allows me to write the Duchess as hidden from sight, and unable to keep her bastard daughter Giovanna. Of course, Nicòletta and Nicòla are the same person, as Nicòla is the sole surviving Frescobaldi family member.

CAN A WOMAN TRULY PRETEND TO BE A MAN?

You only have to look at many names in history to find it is entirely possible. Elisa Bernerström, Saint Marina, Hua Mulan, Hatshepsut, Hannah Snell, Margaret Ann Bulkley, Chevalier d’Eon… the list goes on. It is less about appearance, and more about confidence in pretending to be a man. In a world where men are powerful and women are not even human, it is easy to imagine women adopting new lives so they can live, rather than simply survive.

FRESCOBALDI SAYS “THE MIND OF A MAN IN THE BODY OF A WOMAN.” IS FRESCOBALDI A MAN TRAPPED IN THE WRONG BODY? IS IT RUDE TO ASK THE QUESTION?

In this instance, no, it’s not rude. Nicòla has a female body and a ‘male mind’, as it was thought, at that time, that educating a woman was folly, for they had no imperative other than reproduction. Frescobaldi certainly believes herself a woman, thinks and acts as a woman, but is considered the fantastical creature because it is impossible for a woman to be so naturally intelligent, cunning and capable (so they thought in the 1500’s). Queen Elizabeth I had to routinely say her weak female form was something she managed to overcome. We now know women are just as smart as any man, as capable, as powerful. Frescobaldi believes she has a male mind because that is what she has been told her entire life. Frescobaldi believes herself wholly a woman.

WERE CROMWELL AND HENRY VIII REALLY GOOD FRIENDS?

It is impossible to say for certain. Cromwell definitely gave the King everything he wanted, whenever he wanted it. I personally wrote Henry as a man ready to trust, ready to befriend, despite having been hurt before, the same way he never gave up on love (or what he thought was love). Cromwell was not a stuffy, boring politician – he was widely known as the king of parties and lavish events, hosted the King and everyone of note in England in his manors, was generous, charming, and kept swathes of birds in his Austin Friars garden, along with the ‘beast’ to entertain his guests (I wrote the beast as a leopard for the purpose of the story). I find it entirely possible Henry and Cromwell would have established a bond over the long periods they would have spent together.

Up tomorrow, the last few FAQ’s before we then head into details on the themes featured in the Queenmaker series. 

FRAILTY OF HUMAN AFFAIRS, the first edition in the Queenmaker trilogy, is available worldwide in paperback and on Kindle now.

FROM NOW UNTIL OCTOBER 1ST, GET BOOK ONE FOR 50% off on Kindle.

The moderate man shall inherit the kingdom. That man needs to be the Queenmaker.

London 1529 – Cardinal Wolsey has ruled England in King Henry VIII’s name for most of his reign. Now Henry wants to leave his extraordinary Spanish wife of twenty years, Queen Katherine, to marry Anne Boleyn and secure a male heir for the kingdom. Only God can end a marriage, through his appointed voices on Earth, the powerful Cardinal Wolsey, and Cardinal Campeggio sent from Rome in the Pope’s place. Wolsey’s faithful attendant, commoner Thomas Cromwell, has the mind, the skills and the ambition to secure a royal annulment.

Cromwell’s forgotten past in Italy reappears with Campeggio’s new attendant, Nicóla Frescobaldi, the peculiar son of Cromwell’s former Italian master. While the great Cardinals of Christendom fight the King, the Pope and their God for an annulment, Cromwell and Frescobaldi hold the power over a country at war with its own conscience. Cromwell is called the double-minded man, whose golden eyes make money appear. Now Cromwell wants the power to destroy the Catholic Church in England. Frescobaldi is known as the waif-like creature, the Pope’s favourite companion, but Frescobaldi wants freedom from Pope Clement and his Medici family in Italy.

Cromwell and Frescobaldi will place themselves into the heart of religious and political influence as they strive to create an English queen, or lose their heads for their crimes and sinful secrets.

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